The Midnight Marauder Tweets by @Timbo_slice1995

The Midnight Marauder

heartoflaos:

The Lao Diaspora Project

DIASPORA: A sense of belonging to more than one history, to more than one time and place, to more than one past and future. - John Docker

“Do you have photos worth a thousand words? Does it tell a story about your family’s history? Does it reflect who you are? Does it speak of the journey of where you came from and where you are now?" - LLOTP
Little Laos on the Prairie are accepting photos of Lao-Americans and/or their families by OCTOBER 31ST, 2014, telling a story of how they are able to reach the United States of America & the diaspora they face.
“Why should I share my story?
The Lao community’s stories will help educate the public and officials about our shared journey that has been left out of mainstream history.
The chance for your story to be honored and featured on LLOTP’s website, highlighted in a mini-booklet, turned into a painting, and/or shared in a public gallery.
The opportunity to reflect, relate and learn from others in the Lao Diaspora experience.”

LINKS:
Little Laos on the Prairie Official Site.
Lao Diaspora Project INFO page. (Also contains SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES.)

 Please send your photo if you can. Let’s help support their project!
View Larger

heartoflaos:

The Lao Diaspora Project

DIASPORA: A sense of belonging to more than one history, to more than one time and place, to more than one past and future. - John Docker

Do you have photos worth a thousand words? Does it tell a story about your family’s history? Does it reflect who you are? Does it speak of the journey of where you came from and where you are now?" - LLOTP

Little Laos on the Prairie are accepting photos of Lao-Americans and/or their families by OCTOBER 31ST, 2014, telling a story of how they are able to reach the United States of America & the diaspora they face.

Why should I share my story?

  • The Lao community’s stories will help educate the public and officials about our shared journey that has been left out of mainstream history.
  • The chance for your story to be honored and featured on LLOTP’s website, highlighted in a mini-booklet, turned into a painting, and/or shared in a public gallery.
  • The opportunity to reflect, relate and learn from others in the Lao Diaspora experience.”

LINKS:

Little Laos on the Prairie Official Site.

Lao Diaspora Project INFO page. (Also contains SUBMISSIONS GUIDELINES.)

 Please send your photo if you can. Let’s help support their project!


modernageviking:

From a close friend of Lee’s:
“Bruce had me up to three miles a day, really at a good pace. We’d run the three miles in twenty-one or twenty-tow minutes. Just under eight minutes a mile [Note: when running on his own in 1968, Lee would get his time down to six-and-a-half minutes per mile].
So this morning he said to me “We’re going to go five.”
I said, “Bruce, I can’t go five. I’m a helluva lot older than you are, and I can’t do five.”
He said, “When we get to three, we’ll shift gears and it’s only two more and you’ll do it.”
I said “Okay, hell, I’ll go for it.”
So we get to three, we go into the fourth mile and I’m okay for three or four minutes, and then I really begin to give out.
I’m tired, my heart’s pounding, I can’t go any more and so I say to him, “Bruce if I run any more,” — and we’re still running — “if I run any more I’m liable to have a heart attack and die.” He said, “Then die.” It made me so mad that I went the full five miles.
Afterward I went to the shower and then I wanted to talk to him about it. I said, you know, “Why did you say that?” He said, “Because you might as well be dead. Seriously, if you always put limits on what you can do, physical or anything else, it’ll spread over into the rest of your life. It’ll spread into your work, into your morality, into your entire being. There are no limits. There are plateaus, but you must not stay there, you must go beyond them. If it kills you, it kills you. A man must constantly exceed his level.”

modernageviking:

From a close friend of Lee’s:

“Bruce had me up to three miles a day, really at a good pace. We’d run the three miles in twenty-one or twenty-tow minutes. Just under eight minutes a mile [Note: when running on his own in 1968, Lee would get his time down to six-and-a-half minutes per mile].

So this morning he said to me “We’re going to go five.”

I said, “Bruce, I can’t go five. I’m a helluva lot older than you are, and I can’t do five.”

He said, “When we get to three, we’ll shift gears and it’s only two more and you’ll do it.”

I said “Okay, hell, I’ll go for it.”

So we get to three, we go into the fourth mile and I’m okay for three or four minutes, and then I really begin to give out.

I’m tired, my heart’s pounding, I can’t go any more and so I say to him, “Bruce if I run any more,” — and we’re still running — “if I run any more I’m liable to have a heart attack and die.” He said, “Then die.” It made me so mad that I went the full five miles.

Afterward I went to the shower and then I wanted to talk to him about it. I said, you know, “Why did you say that?” He said, “Because you might as well be dead. Seriously, if you always put limits on what you can do, physical or anything else, it’ll spread over into the rest of your life. It’ll spread into your work, into your morality, into your entire being. There are no limits. There are plateaus, but you must not stay there, you must go beyond them. If it kills you, it kills you. A man must constantly exceed his level.”